Gannon University Welcomes College for Every Student To Campus

Posted: May 22, 2013

 

Gannon University will open its doors to more than 150 students from the Erie School District, at 9:30 a.m. on Thursday, May 23, for an educational visit, to be held in Palumbo Academic Center. The students are all part of a national program, College for Every Student, which focuses on three core practices: mentoring, leadership and service. These three practices are taught in an effort to create pathways to college. 

Keith Taylor, Ph.D., president of Gannon University, will welcome the students to campus at 11:00am in the Palumbo Academic Center on the third floor. A full day is planned for the students as reflected in the agenda below:

 

Schedule of Events     Location: Palumbo Academic Center -3rd Floor

 9:00-9:20 a.m.                 Students Arrive

 9:30-9:45 a.m.                 Students Will Be Setting Up Displays

 9:45-11:00 a.m.               Students to Review Displays

 11:00-11:10 a.m.             Keith Taylor, PH.D., President Will Welcome The Students

 11:10-12:00 p.m.             Exercise on discovering ideas 

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Students and teachers will be on campus to present and discuss projects that they have been working on at their individual schools. The goal will be for the students to share ideas and learn from each other in a very collaborative environment with open discussion and presentations. They will investigate what methods they used to overcome obstacles and what areas of their projects were successful. The students will then have an exercise on discovering four great ideas and then be open to write, discuss and report on their findings.

College For Every Student (CFES) is a nonprofit organization committed to raising the academic aspirations and performance of underserved youth so that they can prepare for, gain access to, and succeed in college. CFES currently works with 200 rural and urban schools and districts in 24 states. Each school works with more than 50 CFES Scholars (low-income youth), most of whom would be first in their family to pursue higher education, to help them get to college and succeed there.