Gannon University Announces Series to Raise Awareness of Concussions

Posted: September 7, 2017

John J. Leddy, M.D., clinical professor in the department of orthopedics at the University at Buffalo's Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, will address Gannon University students, faculty and staff Sept. 12 at 11 a.m. The presentation will be in the Yehl Room of the Waldron Campus Center, 124 W. Seventh St. and is the first of two lectures about the growing danger of concussions.

Concussion awareness has become an increasingly important topic in the United States, with millions of mild traumatic brain injuries happening each year. According to a poll by the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, nearly nine out of 10 adults in the U.S. can't correctly define a concussion. Dr. Leddy's address will increase awareness of this growing health problem.

John J. Leddy, M.D. currently serves as medical director of the University at Buffalo Concussion Management Clinic, the first center in the United States to use a standardized treadmill test to establish recovery from concussion, and to use exercise in the rehabilitation of patients with prolonged concussion symptoms.

Dr. Leddy's primary research interest is the investigation of the basic mechanisms of the disturbance of whole body physiology in concussion and how to help to restore the physiology to normal to help patients recover, and to safely return to activity and sport. Dr. Leddy has published in the fields of orthopedics, sports medicine, physiology, nutrition, concussion and post-concussion syndrome.

The lecture is sponsored by Gannon University's Master of Athletic Training, the Doctor of Physical Therapy, psychology, sport and exercise science department and the Human Performance Lab with funding from a Pennsylvania Athletic Trainers' Society research grant and a Gannon University Faculty Development Grant.

"In concussions, there may be no outward signs that are visible to the general population so general concussion knowledge may be lacking in untrained individuals," said Kathleen Williams of the sport and exercise science department and an organizer of the series. "We want to increase awareness of this problem and give faculty and staff information on how to recognize the symptoms of both acute concussions and post-concussion syndrome."

The second lecture of the series, presented by Brian Hainline, M.D., chief medical officer of the NCAA, is scheduled for Nov. 7 at 11 a.m. in Yehl Room.