Celebrate Gannon Event to Showcase Student Excellence

Posted: April 20, 2017

Gannon University undergraduate and graduate students showcase their scholarly and creative work during the University's annual Celebrate Gannon event, Friday, April 21, 12:30-5:30 p.m. in the Hammermill Center, 620 Peach St. The event is the culmination of a year's worth of scholarship and research and an occasion for the University to celebrate students' hard work, excellence and accomplishments. Gannon's Ruskin, Florida campus will host a comparable event for its Occupational Therapy Doctorate students and faculty a week later.

This year's Celebrate Gannon event is dramatically expanded in size, reflecting increasing numbers of students conducting research projects alongside faculty mentors, traveling the globe, creating their own businesses, and pursuing valuable internships or fieldwork.

The event will feature the work of 453 undergraduate and graduate students in the categories of undergraduate and graduate research, scholarship and engagement. There are also categories for submissions in fine arts and communication arts, including graphic design, photography and poetry.

Students will discuss their work in both platform presentations and poster sessions. Engagement includes experiential projects that demonstrate learning outside the classroom, including service, volunteerism and mission programs.

Perhaps the most significant change is that this year, classes will be canceled for the half-day of the event so that more students and faculty can attend with greater ease and without scheduling conflicts.

Jessica Hartnett, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology and organizer of the event, thinks the emphasis given to the event has brought more participants to Celebrate Gannon. "As a faculty member, you can sometimes forget just how big Gannon University is and how much research and engagement is taking place on this campus," she said. "Celebrate Gannon is a wonderful way to recognize that."

"I don't think you come to Gannon to be mediocre, and part of that drive to be outstanding is to get experiences as a student that are similar to those found in a professional setting," Hartnett said. "Participating in a project that you can put on your CV–not just research and scholarship, but also engagement or participation in community service–is enormously valuable for a student."