Former Congressman Phil English Addresses the Science of Climate Change at Gannon University

Posted: November 10, 2016

Philip English, a senior government relations advisor at Washington, D.C. law firm Arent Fox, will present a lecture, "Science, Culture and Climate Change," on Thursday, November 10 at 7 p.m. in the Yehl Alumni Room of Gannon University's Waldron Campus Center, 124 W. Seventh St. The event is free and the public is invited to attend.

English has been an advocate of green energy initiatives, including the wind energy credit, biodiesel and geothermal. "The public needs to hear what science can tell us about this problem, without preconceptions or political baggage, and then pursue real options," English said. "We owe it to future generations to get this right."

English represented Pennsylvania's Third Congressional District, which includes Erie, for 14 years. He was a member of the House Ways and Means Committee, with jurisdiction over cap-and-trade legislation, and a member of the House Science Committee, which has jurisdiction over climate science.

English serves as co-chair, along with former senator Byron Dorgan, of the firm's government relation practice, which has a major energy policy practice that has included natural gas and renewable energy projects. He currently serves as coordinator of the Healthcare Group Purchasing Industry Initiative (HGPII), which enforces industry standards, promotes best business practices, and monitors adherence to its ethics code by healthcare group purchasing organizations. HGPII is an independent ethics oversight organization with responsibility for a major part of the healthcare supply chain. English is also honorary co-chairman of the Center for Strategic Tax Reform and chairman of the center's board of advisors.

"The American public needs to have an honest and complete debate on the scientific realities of climate change, its costs and consequences," said English. "The polarized response to the possibility of global warming and the role of human contributions to this phenomenon as well as the realistic effectiveness of differing policy responses highlight the difficulty of pursuing a national agenda to deal with this issue."