Associate Professor, Biology Department
Phone: 814-871-5872
Office: Z 222
rawding001@gannon.edu

  • Courses Taught
  • Educational History
  • Professional Societies
  • Publications
  • Scholarship/Research

Courses Taught

  • Molecular and Cellular Biology (BIOL 122)
  • Animal Form and Function (BIOL 124)
  • Endocrinology (BIOL 363)
  • Human Anatomy & Physiology I and II and their laboratories (BIOL 115&116 and BIOL 117&118)
  • Anatomy & Physiology 2 Laboratory (BIOL 111)

  • Special Topics in Biology: Biological Clocks and Rhythms (BIOL 494)
  • Special Topics in Biology: Environmental Physiology (BIOL 494)

Educational History

  • Unversity of Oklahoma, Ph.D.  “Plasma Melatonin in the Mudpuppy, Necturus maculosus”. 1992.  Major field: Physiology; supporting fields: Vertebrate Biology; Biochemistry

Professional Societies

  • The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society.  Member since 2005.
  • The American Physiological Society.  Elected member since 2006.

Publications

  • Cross, Emily E. and  Rawding, Robert S.  2009.  Acute thermal tolerance in the round goby, Apollonia melanostoma (Neogobius melanostomus).  Journal of Thermal Biology 34: 85-92.
     
  • Vagula, Mary C. and  Rawding, Robert.  2012.   Epigenetic Factors and  ACE Gene I/D Polymorphism in Endurance Physiology.  Journal of Applied  Physiology 112: 1084–1085.
     
  • Vagula, Mary C. and Rawding, Robert S. 2012.  Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Asthma and the Role of Airway Smooth Muscle.  Journal of Applied Physiology 113: 844-846.
     
  • Rawding, Robert S.  2013.  The Human Ovarian Cycle: Why Are Undergraduate Texts Still Getting It Wrong?   HAPS EDucator 17(1): 3-10.
     
  • Rawding, Robert S.  2013.  IV. Electrical and Neurotransmitted Snippet: "Why Are 'Neurotransmission' and 'Electricity' Mentioned in the Same Breath?"  HAPS EDucator 17(1): 19.
     

Scholarship/Research

I am examining the importance of stabilizing physiology of fish through acclimation to, particularly, warm and cold exposures over time and, secondarily, lighting regimes.  I use Carassius auratus, the goldfish, as my animal model.  I have been able to determine, with excellent precision, how many hours it requires for goldfish to attain a new steady state when the ambient temperature is reset.