Associate Professor, Philosophy Program
Phone: 814-871-5367
Office: PC 3203
latzer001@gannon.edu

  • Courses Taught
  • Educational History
  • Publications
  • Scholarship/Research

Courses Taught

  • Introduction to Philosophy
  • Philosophy of Ethical Responsibility
  • Philosophy of God
  • Philosophy of Knowledge
  • Philosophy of Science
  • Philosophy of History
  • Logic

Educational History

  • McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario 1985 (B.A.)
  • University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario 1987 (M.A.)
  • University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario 1993 (Ph.D.) Dissertation: "Leibniz's Doctrine of Evil."

Publications

Publications:

  • "The Nature of Evil: Leibniz and His Medieval Background", The Modern Schoolman 71, 1993;
  • Review of G.W. Leibniz, "De l’Horizon de la Doctrine Humain" et "la Restitution Universelle", ed. by Michel Fichant, Leibniz Society Review 3, 1993;
  • "Leibniz’s Conception of Metaphysical Evil", Journal of the History of Ideas 55, 1994;
  • "My God is Not Cruel: The Theodicy of Harold S. Kushner", Encounter 51, 1996;
  • "The Proofs for the Existence of God: Henry of Ghent and Duns Scotus as Precursors of Leibniz", The Modern Schoolman 74, 1997.
  • "'Using a Picture': Wittgenstein and Byzantine Iconography," Encounter 66, 2005.
  • Review of Fergus Kerr, "'Work on Oneself': Wittgenstein's Philosophical Psychology," Newsletter of the American Maritain Association, 2010.
     

Conferences:

  • "Descartes and the Problem of Evil", American Philosophical Association meetings (Central Division), Pittsburgh, 1997, also presented at American Maritain Association meetings, Phoenix, 1996;
  • "Leibniz’s Conception of Metaphysical Evil", American Philosophical Association meetings (Pacific Division), Los Angeles, 1994;
  • Co-chaired session of the Leibniz Society of North America, at American Philosophical Association meetings (Central Division), Chicago, 1993.
  • Chaired session of the International Berkeley Conference, Newport, RI, 2008.


 

Scholarship/Research

I am most interested in Christian Philosophy, especially apologetics, natural theology, theodicy, and religious language.  My current research involves Bishop Berkeley—his theory of religious language, and his arguments with freethinkers and deists.