Graduate Catalog

  •  Director: Fong K. Mak, Ph.D., P.E.

    INTRODUCTION
    The world of electrical and computer engineering is an ever-changing one. The advances over a new graduate's working career of approximately 40 years will be phenomenal with applied undergraduate engineering courses slowly becoming obsolete. The most useful knowledge obtained from the undergraduate courses is the mathematics, engineering science, and humanities courses plus the acquired ability to attack and solve new problems in a forthright manner. Graduate school is the next step in a lifetime of learning for both new graduates and for those who have been out a few years and recognize the need for more education.

    DEGREES OFFERED
    The program offers both a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (MSEE) degree and a Master of Science in Embedded Software Engineering (MSES) degree.

    ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

    1. Applicants must have earned a Bachelor's degree in Electrical 1. or Computer Engineering from an ABET accredited program or its equivalent with a QPA of 2.5 or better. 

    2. Applicants with non-electrical or computer engineering degrees 2. may be admitted, but required to take additional course work as determined by the program director. 

    3. Applicants must submit the following: 

      •  Completed application 

      •  Transcripts for all prior college course work 

      •  Three recommendation letters  

      • TOEFL scores if English is not a first language 

    CURRICULUM
    Upon commencement of graduate studies, the student will choose to study for an Electrical Engineering or Embedded Software degree. The student will be assigned an initial advisor by the program director. The advisor and student will select appropriate courses for the objectives of the student and obtain approval of this course-of-study through the academic approval sequence. All students must take the following two courses during the first 12 credits:
    Course Requirements. 

    • GECE 502 Embedded C Programming 

    • GECE 704 Advanced Engineering Analysis

    All students must complete at least one systems development course prior to graduation. Systems development courses include: 

    • GENG 580 Requirements Engineering 

    • GENG 570 Introduction to Systems Engineering 

    • GECE 501 Engineering Project & Management

    Afte rthe student has completed 12 credits of study, the student will be assessed relative to their preparedness to begin thesis or project work. The candidate must have a 3.0 QPA to continue for the degree. The candidate must then choose one of the three project/thesis plans below for completion of their degree and an advisor will be assigned to guide the candidate for the completion of the degree work. Students cannot register for project/thesis credits until after 12 credits of graduate work are completed (see plans A, B, and C below). The degrees require a total of 30 credit hours of graduate work. Up to 6 credits of approved graduate work can be transferred from another graduate program.
    Plan A (Thesis):
    The candidate will be required to submit a 6 credit thesis as part of the 30 credits of graduate course work and pass a final oral examination on the thesis material and related subjects. The thesis work must be approved by the academic approval sequence prior to the commencement of the research work. The thesis advisor will direct the student’s work and determine when to recommend the manuscript for review by a faculty committee. The review committee will be appointed by the usual academic approval sequence and will consist of at least three full-time Gannon engineering faculty members familiar with the subject material and one member from outside the ECE department. The outside member can be from industry. The advisor will be the chair of the review committee.
    Plan B (Project):
    The student will be required to complete a design project and to pass a final examination covering the student’s project and related subject areas. The project can be worth 3 or 6 graduate credits as part of the 30 credits of graduate course work depending on the difficulty of the project. The project must be approved by the usual academic approval sequence prior to the commencement of the project work. The project advisor will direct the student’s work and determine when to recommend the manuscript for review by a faculty committee. The review committee will be appointed by the usual academic approval sequence and will consist of at least three full-time Gannon engineering faculty members familiar with the subject material and one will be the chair of the review committee.
    Plan C (Project Course):
    The student will be required to complete a 3 credit course designated as a project course. The project course will be approved by the usual academic approval sequence prior to the commencement of the project work and must include a significant project for its completion. The course instructor will inform the student of the complete requirements for the project course and will be responsible for seeing that the student satisfies these requirements. Students are required to prepare a manuscript in thesis format for the project.

    DEGREE PROGRAMS 

    Electrical Engineering Degree
    The goal of the program is to give an Electrical and Computer Engineering graduate the necessary education to be an effective design or systems engineer. The student shall devise a curriculum with his/her advisor to pursue knowledge in advanced control theory, system modeling, electronics, communication, systems engineering, and embedded software. The student must complete at least 9 credits of Electrical Engineering program courses and satisfy the project/thesis requirement in Electrical Engineering.

    Embedded Software Engineering Degree
    The goal of the program is to give an Electrical and Computer Engineering graduate the necessary education to be an effective embedded software/systems engineer. The student shall devise a curriculum with his/her advisor to pursue knowledge in computer hardware and software implementation strategies, software development, software quality measures, software design and testing techniques, microprocessors, digital system design and/or hardware description languages. The student must complete at least 9 credits of Embedded Software Engineering program courses in system, software, hardware categories, and satisfy the project/thesis requirement in a topic related to Embedded Software Engineering.

    Co-op Track
    The objective of the co-op track is to present an academic program combined with application training on actual industrial problems in engineering environments. This is to give students a targeted education on real-world problems. Students may join this program after completing sufficient coursework to be successful in an industrial environment, and receiving approved industrial sponsorship. International students must meet USCIS eligibility requirements.Students accepted to the co-op track are assigned a Gannon professor as a mentor, and must take the Graduate Professional Experience (GENG700-series) course each semester they are enrolled in the program.Students must complete 30 credits of graduate course work in addition to their Graduate Professional Experience courses. Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 for the duration of their master’s degree program, and fulfill all other requirements for their degree.

    Professional Track
    Gannon runs a two year work-study program with local industry in Erie. The objective of the track is to present an academic program combined with application training on actual industrial problems to give students a targeted education, complemented by hands-on, real-world development exposure. Students are selected for this track based on academic background, leadership skills, and communication skills. The student is assigned a Gannon professor as a mentor while working at the industrial site. The mentor advises the student on his academic work and guides the student on industrial engineering projects. The projects are carefully chosen to reinforce classroom work and to develop the students into outstanding engineers. In addition to the mentorship in technical areas, the professor also mentors the student in leadership skills, work and personal ethics, and communication skills that are needed in the industrial workplace. This track requires that the student work on these projects half time during the school year and full time during the summer. The students receive full tuition and a yearly stipend for their work. Students need to apply and be accepted separately for this program. The number of students in this track is dependent on availability of industrial sponsorship.
    The students earn either an Electrical Engineering degree or an Embedded Software Engineering degree. There are two tracks for the program:
    Embedded Software track (leads to Embedded Software degree) and the Systems and Modeling track (leads to Electrical Engineering degree). All students in the professional track must have equivalent background (academic or professional) in Automatic Control. Furthermore, all students in the Embedded software track must have equivalent background in C++ and Data Structures.The recommended curriculum is as follows:

    Embedded Software  Systems and Modeling 
    Summer second Session
    Intro to Embedded Systems
    Orientation and Curricular Practical Training (CPT)

     
    Intro to Embedded Systems
    Orientation and Curricular Practical Training (CPT)

     
    Fall First Semester
    Engineering Analysis I#*
    Requirements Engineering*
    Adv Digital Design
    CPT
     
    Engineering Analysis I#*
    Requirements Engineering*
    System Modeling*
    CPT
    Spring Second Semester
    Engineering Analysis II*
    Embedded Kernel*
    Embedded Systems Design*
    CPT

     
    Engineering Analysis II*
    Adv Programming in C/C++
    Electric Machine Modeling*
    CPT
    Summer
    CPT

     
    CPT
    Fall Third Semester
    RTOS Applications+
    Hw/Sw Co-design
    Personal Software Process*
    CPT

     
    Control of Electric Drives
    Power Electronics
    Elective
    CPT

     
    Spring Fourth Semester
    Project/thesis
    Elective
    Elective
    CPT

     
    Project/thesis
    Digital·Control
    Elective
    CPT

     

    # Substitutions for this course may be approved by advisor and Department Chair.
    * Required courses for professional track
    +special topic electives

    COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    » Courses of Interest for All Options 
    GECE 501 Engineering Project & Management
    3 credits
    This is one of the core courses for the electrical and computer engineering graduate students. Engineering development process from inception to product will be covered. The function of systems engineering is to guide the engineering of complex systems that is the collection of components, people, facilities, and procedures organized to accomplish some common objectives. This course will focus on the skills required to manage the development of effective system architectures from concept through engineering design and production. Topics include, but are not limited to, the structure of complex systems, project management, system development process, requirement specifications, functional decomposition, system modeling techniques and modern toolsets, hardware-in-the-loop simulation and control, system testing, and oral and written communication issues.

    GECE 502 Embedded C Programming
    3 credits
    This course is designed for students to build a solid foundation in embedded programming using the C language. Intermediate C programming techniques and embedded environment considerations will be discussed. Contents of the course include: C and embedded systems, program structure, variables and memory implication, flow control, arrays, pointers, structure and union, functions, I/O’s, preprocessor directives, GNU development tools, and basic UNIX/LINUX operations.

    GECE 507 Web Programming
    3 credits
    Prerequisite: GCIS 501 or equivalentThis course provides the knowledge of theory and techniques of data communications and advanced web programming. The course introduces students to a wide range of topics in computer networking and web programming, including data transmission, packet transmission, internetworking, TCP/IP, network applications, Java, CGI languages, and other various script languages.

    GECE 509 Software Tools
    3 credits
    Prerequisite: GENG 585 or equivalentFocus on the Unix programming environment and the various tools for software development, application environments and techniques. Topics include operating systems, standards, real-time programming, concurrency, software testing, metrics, IPC techniques, scripting, compilers, interactive debugging.

    GECE 704 Advanced Engineering Analysis
    3 credits
    This course focuses on theory and application of linear algebra, ordinary differential equations, Laplace transform, Fourier analysis, partial differential equation, probability and statistics for solving engineering problems. Application of Matlab.

    GENG 570 Introduction to Systems Engineering
    3 credits
    The function of systems engineering is to guide the engineering of complex systems, that is the collection of components, people, facilities and procedures organized to accomplish some common objectives. This course explores the life cycle of systems, and the skills required to manage the development effective system architectures from concepts through engineering design and production. Topics include, but are not limited to the structure of complex systems, system development processes, systems engineering management, needs analysis, systems requirements management, program risk, functional analysis and design, integration and system evaluation.

    GENG 580 Requirements Engineering
    3 credits
    Requirements engineering process from initial requirements elicitation through to requirements validation for systemsengineering. The course includes specific techniques for the analysis, modeling, validation, and management of requirements for engineering projects, and is applicable to software, mechanical, electrical, process and other types of engineering projects. Topics include requirements processes, documents, elicitation, analysis, management, modeling, viewpoint analysis, non-functional requirements, advanced topics.

    GENG 582 Fuzzy Control
    3 credits
    This course provides a fundamental understanding of fuzzy logic with application to control theory. The methodology provides a method for constructing nonlinear controllers via the use of heuristic information for real-world problems. The fuzzy controller emulates the decision making process of the human. Engineering evaluations of performance and comparative analysis with conventional control methods are used.

    GENG 585 Advanced Programming In C/C++
    3 credits
    Problem analysis. Translation path from pseudo-code to implementation. Comparison of C and C++ implementations. Critical evaluation of time, memory, and program structure. Programming style.

    GENG 586 Object-Oriented Modeling
    3 credits
    Prerequisite: GENG 580 or GCIS 504 or 566 or 567 or permission of instructorAn advanced treatment of methods for producing an object-oriented design, including structural, behavioral, and architectural design. Focus is on Object-Oriented analysis and design methods and design processes they support. Includes treatment of the Unified Modeling Language (UML) techniques and their application to systems/software development

    GENG 588 Modern Control Theory
    3 credits
    Linear spaces and operators, mathematical descriptions of systems. Linear dynamical systems and impulse response, matrices. Controllability and observability of linear dynamical systems. Irreducible realizations of rational transfer function matrices. Canonical forms, state feedback and state estimators. Stability of linear systems. Composite systems; linear optimal control and linear distributed systems

    GENG 589 Digital Control
    3 credits
    This course deals with the control of dynamic systems by employing classical and model control tools incorporating a digital computer in the control loop. It provides the background needed for those practicing engineers, who have studied the concepts of continuous-time control, to enhance their knowledge in the area of digital control system. Topics include the Z-transform, digital control system design, filters design, and the state-space approach to control system design. Modern software tools such as Matlab/Simulink will be used.

     GENG 590-599 Special Topics in Engineering
    3 credits
    Special courses developed from study interest in all areas of Engineering. Brief description of current content to be announced in schedule of classes.

    GENG 603 Engineering Analysis I
    3 credits
    The theory and application to engineering problems of Laplace transforms, generalized Fourier transforms and Linear Algebra.

    GENG 609 Nonlinear Analysis
    3 credits
    Introduction to the understanding of nonlinear characteristic of mechanical and electrical components and systems. Basic analytical, graphical and numerical methods are presented. Introduction to chaotic dynamics and nonlinear control.

    GENG 648 Modeling and Simulation of Dynamic Systems
    3 credits
    This interdisciplinary course presents mathematical modeling methods for physical dynamic systems containing electrical, mechanical, and control components. Included are the application of physical principles, energy approaches, non-dimensional techniques, and discretization of continuous systems. Numerical simulation of linear and nonlinear models will be studied and compared to experimental results. Problems of current interest will be used as examples.

    GENG 678 System Testing
    3 credits
    Prerequisite: GENG 586This course covers the fundamentals of testing engineering systems and their models. Includes coverage of types of testing, fundamental problems in testing, purposes for testing, testcase design, quality assurance and test planning. Topics include prototype testing, validation testing, acceptance testing, and other topics.

    GENG 685 Advanced Control Systems
    3 credits
    This course treats the analysis and design of linear control systems from the point view of state space representations. Topics will include system modeling, coordinate transformation, controllability, observability, output feedback, state feedback, linear quadratic regulators, and linear estimators. Additionally, an introduction to nonlinear control is presented with the topics of feedback linearization and adaptive control. Applications from interdisciplinary current state-of-art systems will be presented.

    GENG 689 Stability Analysis of Multidimensional Dynamic Systems
    3 credits
    Fundamental concepts of stability for carious classes of dynamic systems are examined and discussed. The systems considered include multidimensional lumped-parameter systems that can be described by linear differential equations. The systems under consideration are divided into certain well-defined classes, and various phenomena related to vibrations and stability of these systems are exposed systematically. Although the course examples are drawn from mechanical systems, the general nature of formulation can be applied to systems of similar nature in other disciplines, such as electrical circuits.

    GENG 690-699 Special Topics in Engineering
    3 credits
    Special courses developed from study interest in all areas of Engineering. Brief description of current content to be announced in schedule of classes. Graduate courses in the 600 series are open to graduate students only.

    GENG 700-702 Graduate Professional Experience
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Discipline-specific industrial sponsorshipThis course complements regular academic training with hands-on, real-world development exposure. Students are required to be engaged in practical training during the course. International students require Curricular Practical Training (CPT) approval. Topics include issues facing engineering and computing professionals, trends in the fields, job prospects, team and workplace behavior, project leadership as well as reviews of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

    GENG 703 Engineering Analysis II
    3 credits
    Solving engineering problems using ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, series solutions to differential equations. Complex analysis applied to engineering problems.

    GENG 796 Directed Project
    3 credits
    Those students choosing their research project option will complete a directed research project. The student must submit a project proposal to the department for approval. Upon approval of the topic, the department Chair will appoint a three member committee to oversee the project. The student will perform the literature search, complete the project, and submit a project report that conforms to department thesis guidelines, and pass an oral defense.

    GENG 797 Thesis
    6 credits
    Those students choosing the thesis option must select a directed project with a research component. The student must submit a thesis proposal to the department for approval. Upon approval of the topic, the department Chair will appoint a three member committee to oversee the project. The student will perform the literature search, complete the project, submit a thesis report that conforms to department thesis guidelines, and pass an oral defense. Additionally, thesis students are expected to submit a paper on their work suitable for publication.

    » Courses of Interest for Embedded Software Option
    GECE 500 Introduction to Embedded Systems

    3 credits*
    This course orients students to embedded system concepts and gives different embedded system applications. The course is structured as a series of lectures and training sessions at General Electric Transportation System work site. Topics include but not restricted to the following: Software QSP/QSW, DC locomotive overview, ISO9000 overview, CSE overview, Toll Gate overview, OTC overview, DFSS training, Software Process, Traction System overview, RMD overview, OHV overview, System Integration overview, IFC overview, Formal Technical overview, DC Simulator overview, FTR recording, Simulink training.
    *3 credit hours – does not apply toward the degree requirement.

    GECE 506 Personal Software Process
    3 credits
    Prerequisite: GENG 585 or equivalent.
    The Personal Software Process (PSP) is a process-based method that software engineers use in the development of large-scale projects. It uses quality management principles and the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) framework to demonstrate the benefits of using sound engineering principles in software development and maintenance work. Defect management, design and code reviews, design templates, and process analysis will be used. Here, the students progresses through a sequence of software processes that provide a sound foundation for large scale software development.

    GECE 508 Embedded Software Paradigms
    3 credits
    Prerequisites: GENG 585
    Course focuses on the design and development of embedded and real-time systems. Embedded software design techniques and considerations. Overview of embedded systems & software design processes. Systems and software quality considerations. Hardware tools and trends.

    GECE 510 Software Engineering Processes
    3 credits
    Prerequisite: GENG 585 or equivalent.
    Fundamental embedded software design techniques and considerations. Fundamental Method Goals of quantity, repeatability, measurability. Design and Analysis Methodologies focusing on object-oriented design and testing. Design processes of waterfall, spiral, and knowledge based. Risk analysis, software project management, including knowledge strategies plus economics and metrics of a software project.

    GECE 511 Embedded Kernel
    3 credits
    Real-time embedded kernel development and implementation. Begins with the implementation of a non-preemptive kernel, add features, and transform into a preemptive kernel. Topics include interrupt management, time management, task management, inter-task communication and synchronization, and memory management.

    GECE 515 Software Testing & Quality Assurance
    3 credits
    This course is concerned with understanding the role of quality assurance in the software development cycle, and applying these techniques to software products. Course topics include test design methods, test planning, automated test support, quality measurement and quality tracking techniques.

    GECE 539 Real-time System Implementation
    3 credits
    This is a project oriented course. It is designed for students to get familiarity and hands-on experiences with the real-time system implementation process using Matlab Real-time Workshop and Real-time Workshop Embedded Coder tools.

    GECE 545 Advanced Digital Design
    2 credits
    Advanced topics in top-down digital design and bottom-up verification are introduced. Combinatorial and sequential logic design, circuit aspects of logic devices, families, and interfaces are reviewed. CAD tools using schematic and hardware description language based design entry for simulation, synthesis, post-synthesis analysis and implementation on a programmable target device are exposed. Industry standard integrated design and development environments will be used throughout the course.

    GECE 546 Advanced Digital Design Lab
    1 credit
    Laboratory to accompany GECE 545 Advanced Digital Logic. Must be taken concurrently with GECE 545.

    GECE 547 Embedded Systems Design
    3 credits
    This is a project oriented course. It is designed to deliver the concepts of microprocessor-based design flow and hardware/software design integration. Discussions include CPU architectures, instruction sets, interrupts, peripheral configurations, software development, real-time operating system, as well as hardware-in-the-loop debugging and testing.

    GECE 549 VHDL
    3 credits
    This is an introductory course for the VHDL hardware description language that targets the programmable logic and ASIC design. The usage of the language in representation, simulation, verification and synthesis areas is studied with extensive lab assignments. Essential syntax and semantics of the VHDL language including design entity, architectural bodies, concurrent and sequential statements, processes, data types, packages, configurations, register transfer level design are among the covered topics.

    GECE 550 Hw/Sw Co-Design
    3 credits
    Top-down system level embedded design for large-scale systems containing hardware and software components are considered. Development flow shall include a) requirements to design specifications b) hardware and software partitioning c) trade off analysis between self development and reuse for intellectual property and real-time OS d) HDL-based hardware design, simulation and testing, e) OO software design, simulation and verification.

    GECE 551 Rapid Prototyping with FPGA
    3 credits
    Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) has become an essential part of the digital system design flow for many applications. They provide inexpensive solutions for hardware prototypes and fastest time-to-market. The novelty and programmability also allow design explorations towards optimal architecture. This course will cover the FPGA features and architectures, rapid prototyping aspect of FPGA use, FPGA configuration techniques, hardware simulation and debugging, as well as the modern digital synthesis and hardware analysis skills and tools. Other commercial programmable logic devices (PLD) will also be discussed.

    GENG 580 Requirements Engineering
    3 credits**

    GENG 586 Object-Oriented Modeling
    3 credits**

    **Please see course description in the Course of Interest for All Options

    » Courses of Primary Interest for Electrical Engineering Option

    GECE 520 Advanced Instrumentation and Measurement
    3 credits
    This course emphasizes the use of National Instruments (NI) tools to perform data acquisition, measurement techniques and instrument control. Data acquisition will include analog and digital I/O, signal conditioning and sensors. Measurement techniques will include time-frequency analysis, data filtering, and distortion measurements. Instrument control will include serial port, GPIB communications and instrument drivers.

    GECE 521 VLSI Design
    3 credits
    Focuses on the theory, design, implementation, and testing of Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) Circuits and associated technologies. Primarily focuses on CMOS technologies and their implementation. Includes a review of CMOS circuits & theory, overview of MOS fabrication technology, circuit characterizations and performance estimation, electrical & physical design of logic gates, clocking strategies, I/O structures, system design and test methods, design synthesis, and advanced topics.

    GECE 527 Intro to Electric Drives
    3 credits
    This course uses an integrative approach to allow examination of all subsystems that make up an electric drive system. The approach requires minimum prerequisites in circuit and system and electromagnetic field theory to understand the essentials of the topics covered. The topics covered include electric machines, power-electronics-based converters, understanding mechanical system requirements, feedback controller design, and interaction of drives with the utility grid

    GECE 530 Sensors and Actuators
    3 credits
    This is an introductory course on the subject of control system instrumentation, with an emphasis on sensors, transducer, and actuators. Specifically, this course deals with “instrumentation” a control system through the incorporation of suitable sensors, actuators, and associated interface hardware. The control system architectures are reviewed first prior to detailed discussion of the component interconnection and signal conditioning, and performance specification and analysis. Then the operation principles and characteristics of a series of analog sensors and digital transducers are studied. Finally, the stepper motors as well as continuous-drive actuators (DC and AC motors) are covered.

    GECE 537 Advanced Computer Architecture
    3 credits
    Focuses on the design and implementation of the instruction-set architecture. Performance measures, ALU design, data and control path design, evolving into custom high performance processor design using VHDL, pipelining, memory hierarchy design, cache memory and advanced topics.

    GECE 545 Advanced Digital Design
    2 credits*

    GECE 546 Advanced Digital Design Lab
    1 credit*

    GECE 547 Embedded Systems Design
    2 credits*

    GECE 548 Embedded Systems Design Laboratory
    1 credit*

    GECE 549 VHDL
    3 credits*

    GECE 556 RF Circuit Integration
    3 credits
    Application of concepts from Circuits, Electronics and Fields to radio frequency design techniques as applied to state-of-the-art electronic devices.

    GECE 565 Power Electronics
    3 credits
    This course introduces the basic concepts of various topologies (ac-dc, dc-dc, dc-ac, ac-ac, etc) of power converters. The fundamental principles of switching components are discussed first prior to introduction of the design and application of the converters. Emphases are on the design issues associated with the converters and the computer techniques (PSpice) used for the performance evaluation and analysis. Experiments are part of the course.

    GECE 566 Modeling and Analysis of Electric Drives
    3 credits
    This course introduces the issues on modeling and analysis of electrical drives. Basic concepts of electromechanical energy conversion will be presented prior to the detailed modeling of the dynamical aspects of both the DC and AC machines. Dynamic behavior of the machines and their computer simulation will be examined. Numerical schemes for simulation, singular perturbation technique, linearization technique, etc. are parts of the analysis tools. In addition, modeling of switching power conversion will be studied as it pertains to drive application. If time permits, some other practical aspects of drives will be examined, too.

    GECE 572 Digital Signal Processing
    3 credits
    This course emphasizes the fundamental principles of signal and systems, sampling theorem, discrete-time Fourier transform, power spectrum, z-transform, discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and the FFT algorithm, digital filter design and implementation.

    GECE 573 Introduction to Neural Networks
    3 credits
    Data management, pattern recognition and classification, neural networks models, learning schemes, genetic algorithms, applications of neural networks.

    GECE 574 Artificial Neural Networks
    3 credits
    This course will present artificial neural network (ANN) architectures and computational algorithms suited for practical engineering applications. Topics will include an overview of artificial neural networks and neural computing, elementary ANN building blocks and models. Concepts of learning and training rules, the back-propagation algorithm as well as examples and discussion of several classes of ANN such as feed-forward networks, multilayer networks, recurrent networks, and self-organizing networks will be presented.

    GECE 575 DSP System-level Design & Integration
    3 credits
    This is a hands-on laboratory-based course with emphasis on design and integration of digital signal processing (DSP) systems. Industry-standard tools such as NI-LabVIEW, Matlab/Simulink, and TI-DSK processor boards will provide the platform to build and test systems such as analog-to-digital converters (ADC), sampling rate converters, digital FIR and IIR filters, spectrum analyzers. DSP implementation and system integration will be emphasized through laboratory projects such as dual-tone multi-frequency analysis, adaptive noise cancellation, and software-defined radio.Pre-requisite: GECE 572

    GECE 583 Introduction to Communication Systems
    3 credits
    This course emphasizes Fourier Series/ Transform, frequency shifting concepts ideally and in reality. Analog modulation techniques and technology including enhancement techniques (AM, SSB and FM), sampling theory and digital modulation (PAM, PWM, PPM, PCM). Noise considerations in determining best SNR technique. Multiplexing and practical examples included

    GECE 584 Power System Analysis and Control3 creditsBasic principles in power system analysis; models for elements of power system components, the per unit system, Load flow analysis; optimal dispatch of generation; synchronous machine transient analysis; balanced faults; symmetrical Components and unbalanced faults; stability; power system control.

    GECE 585 Wireless System Applications
    3 credits
    This course will cover topics in wireless and mobile communications and their application to the design of systems and networks. These topics will include cellular concepts, beam formation, path loss, fading, and multi-path in radio propagation, digital modulation formats, equalization, diversity, coding, and multiple access techniques. Wireless local area networks (WLAN), global system for mobile (GSM), and wideband CDMA (W-CDMA) will be discussed.

    GECE 586 Computer Communication Networks
    3 credits
    This course introduces fundamental concepts and theories in data and computer communications and networking. Topics include data transmission techniques and encoding for data communication, networking techniques, circuit and packet switching, and network access protocols.
    Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instructor consent

    GECE 587 Wireless Data Communications
    3 credits
    This course introduces a comprehensive list of topics in the emerging field of wireless data communications. Focused on upper layer (above the physical layer) protocols and operations for wireless data transmission. Topics include wireless cellular system infrastructures, wireless circuit data, wireless packet data, mobile IP, and packet data in third generation wireless networks. Various existing and soon-to-be available wireless data systems and technologies are also discussed.
    Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instructor consent

    GECE 588 Simulation of Communication Systems
    3 credits
    Comprehensive course for simulation-based design and analysis of communication systems; Focused on the physical layer in the context of the OSI-layer model of communication systems, topics include modeling of communication systems, performance measures and statistical methods for interpretation of simulation results, simulation techniques and technology, and case studies.
    Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instructor consent (desired: GECE 583 or equivalent)

    GECE 590-599 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering
    3 credits
    Special courses developed from study interest in all areas of Electrical Engineering and Embedded Software. Brief description of current content to be announced in schedule of classes.

    GECE 671 Design of Electrical Machinery
    3 credits
    A design-oriented course which emphasizes realistic characteristics and specifications applicable to AC and DC motors and generators leading to an individual design project.

    GECE 672 Digital Image Processing
    3 credits
    Prerequisite: GECE 572This course presents strategies to process digital image data. Topics covered will include the representation and perception of images, the use of operations in the spatial and spatial-frequency domains to segment, enhance, filter, and restore digital images as well as transformations of images for multi-resolution analysis. Algorithms will be implemented and evaluated in Matlab/Simulink.

    GECE 673 Control of AC Drives
    3 credits
    This course introduces the concept of AC drives. Various types of converters and inverters suitable for AC drives and the related control issues are presented and studied. The modeling and dynamical aspects of AC machines will be examined prior to the detailed discussion of the control issues and techniques such as vector control and field orientation, etc.

    GECE 680 Digital Communication
    3 credits
    This is a graduate course in the analysis of digital communication systems. Methods to understand and analyze digitally modulated signals are presented. Optimum receiver designs, synchronization issues, and coding strategies for different channel models are developed. Communications over fading, multipath and band-limited channels is studied using Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) schemes and Spread Spectrum (SS) approaches.

    GECE 681 Optical Devices and Systems
    3 credits
    This course is an introduction to electroptics. This includes wave propagation, interaction with both iso and anisotropic materials, modulation techniques, lenses and lens systems and optical sources and detectors. Subsystems are considered initially but typical optical systems and applications are considered.

    GECE 690-699 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering
    3 credits
    Special courses developed from study interest in all areas of Electrical Engineering or Embedded Software. Brief description of current content to be announced in schedule of classes. Graduate courses in the 600 series are open to graduate students only.
    * Please see course description in the Embedded Software Engineering Option